Hours of Operation

Monday - Friday: 9 am to 6 pm
Saturday: 9 am to noon
Closed Sundays and holidays

Please follow & like us!
Follow by Email
RSS Feed
Subscribe by email
Get new posts by email:

Archive for October, 2010

Happy Birthday to Ann Mayer Weeks on Thursday, October 28.

We just wanted to wish Ann Mayer Weeks a happy birthday on October 28th. As many of you know, Ann is quite the fisher-woman. But we know her secret–she has lucky fishing shorts that pull the fish to her (you can just see the pale peach of her lucky fishing shorts in this photo). Sadly, Ann has worn these shorts on so many fishing expeditions that they are nothing but a rag, as thin as tissue paper. What will happen when the lucky shorts finally disintegrate? Will Ann’s fishing ability evaporate?

We don’t think so.

Ann, we hope your birthday is as much fun as a day out on the Lake when you are catching more fish than Richard and Roger combined!

Don Keating, Bigfoot Investigator, Will Visit the Plain City Library on October 27 at 7 pm.

Don Keating, who has been investigating Bigfoot sightings since 1984, will make an appearance at the Plain City Public Library on Wednesday, October 27 at 7 pm to talk about Bigfoot in Ohio (and other places). Keating is a bit of a Bigfoot celebrity having been interviewed by television shows, radio talk shows, as well as being featured on The History Channel’s “Monster Quest.” Keating has also produced documentaries on his investigations in Ohio and just re-released his 1993 book, “The Buckeye Bigfoot.”

To see a book review of “The Buckeye Bigfoot,” visit this YouTube site: Buckeye Bigfoot Book Review

I really like the guy’s hat who does the book review.

To learn more about Don Keating, read his Bio here: Don Keating Bio

For more information on the Library’s Evening with Don Keating: Bigfoot Program

Answering Questions for the Student Chapter of NCPA at OSU.

On Monday, October 18, Joe and I attended The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy’s Student Chapter of NCPA (National Community Pharmacists Association) lunchtime meeting. Joe spoke to the group of attending pharmacy students about the importance of independent pharmacies and the role NCPA plays in helping students and independents. I was just mainly there for moral support for Joe. Our fourth year pharmacy student, Matt Byrdy, who is doing his rotation with us this month, also kindly attended.

Our other pharmacy student, Evelyne Ntam, is the president of the student chapter of NCPA and had invited Joe to speak to her fellow students. Evelyne gave Joe a list of questions that she wanted him to answer during his talk, but he ran out of time and instead informed them that he would answer them via the blog (which means that I am now taking his answers and making them sound very, very intelligent!).

Please remember that as you are reading the answers to these questions that this is Joe replying.

Why did I choose pharmacy? When I was in high school, I worked for Wal-Mart in Urbana, Ohio as a stockman. I was in charge of signage for the entire store, plus I was always building items or retrieving things from top shelves for people. Because of these job requirements, I quite often toted around a 16 foot ladder. This ladder really required two people to carry it, but usually I was the one weaving it through the aisles by myself. Because of my constant handling of the ladder, I developed a lot of blisters on my hands that eventually turned into calluses. I had rough, working hands.

When I was maneuvering the ladder around the store, I often passed by the pharmacy. The pharmacist, Bob, was always sitting on a little stool smoking a cigarette (completely unacceptable today, but okay in the late 80’s) and listening to the stock report on his AM radio. One day, as I passed by, Bob stopped me to have me carry something for him. I was a Junior in high school at that time and trying to decide what I wanted to do when I got to college. I began asking Bob if he thought I could be a pharmacist. He told me that I just had to be good at math and science and if I worked hard enough I could make enough money to buy a Maserati.

I didn’t know what a Maserati was until later when I looked it up in a book in our school library (this was before the days of the internet–hard to imagine there was ever a time, but it did exist) and discovered that, yes, I would like an expensive Italian sports car like Joe Walsh sang about. What I noticed at the time, however, when I was talking to Bob, were his baby soft, pink hands–completely un-callused and velvety smooth. I decided that I wanted a job where I could have hands like Bob’s.

Why did I choose OSU? While many of the students who come to OSU come from many, many miles away, I did not have that option. I had to choose the school closest to me, because I was going to commute from home, and I had to choose the one that was the most cost effective, because I was going to pay for it myself. I checked into Cincinnati and Ohio Northern, but they were too expensive and too far away. I could not afford to live on campus. Plus, once I found out that OSU’s College of Pharmacy was ranked fifth in the nation, I was very happy OSU had been closest and cheapest.

When and why did I choose to become an independent pharmacy owner? As I was approaching graduation from pharmacy school, I was called for jury duty. Jury duty for Madison County, where I lived, was held in the county seat of London, Ohio. While I was on my lunch from jury duty, I happened to walk by The Medicine Shoppe and stopped in. That was when I met pharmacist Ernie Sparks and fell in love with independent pharmacy. Ernie’s store was so busy and the customers all seemed to love and respect Ernie. That was a new aspect that I had never seen. In many of the chains I had worked for, the customers took out all their anger on the pharmacists and didn’t seem to like or respect them. I heard people calling Ernie “Doc” and asking him for advise on everything from medical problems to car problems. This felt like a huge family and I liked it.

While I was in the store, I asked Ernie if I could do a rotation with him. He told me that if I filled out all the paperwork and got things set up for him to be a preceptor, he’d love to have me. And that began my love of independents. It was such an exciting environment and Ernie controlled every aspect of that environment.

Is it recommended to work for someone before buying a store? I would definitely recommend either working for an independent pharmacy or doing several rotations at independent pharmacies before making the decision to be a pharmacy owner. By getting work experience in an independent, you will be more ready to face the unique challenges of this career.

What challenges do I face as an independent pharmacy owner? One of the biggest challenges is unfair competition with chain stores and insurance companies. For example, I will fill a prescription for one of our patients. Within a few days, they get a letter in the mail or a personal phone call from their insurance company telling them they should get their prescriptions filled at XYZ pharmacy which is owned by the insurance company. The patient doesn’t know this. They think that somehow I have given this information out to another pharmacy and violated their privacy. Or they are told if they go to the other pharmacy, it will be cheaper. Sometimes, they get letters saying that the only pharmacy that takes their insurance is this other place, even though I obviously do.

If it came down to just beating the chains and mail order through service, we would win every time. We know our customers by name. We deliver to their door. We buy our groceries and other things locally. We support the schools and give to charitable organizations that work within Plain City and the surrounding areas. We are active in our community. But we have to compete with mail order and chains that use unfair practices and don’t care a bit about the Plain City community.

How did I choose our current location? Robin and I chose Plain City, because we lived here and there had not been a pharmacy in the town for over seven years.

What is my best advice for students interested in becoming an independent pharmacy owner? My advice for students would be for them to join NCPA and attend meetings, conferences, and take advantage of other opportunities provided by the organization. NCPA offers a super way to network with people involved in independent pharmacy. I would also advise getting an independent pharmacy mentor, someone who owns their own store and can show you the ropes. Ernie Sparks of Ernie’s London Apothecary (formerly The Medicine Shoppe) in London, Ohio was my mentor. I still call him when I have questions or face challenges.

Additionally, NCPA offers a pharmacy “Ownership Workshop” that I would recommend attending. Robin and I went to one of these workshops in 1997 in Memphis, TN right before we opened Plain City Druggist in 1999. This workshop gave me the confidence I needed to open our pharmacy.

Where do I see the future of independent pharmacy going? I think the future of independent pharmacy is very promising. There are going to be a lot of stores changing hands in the next few years as older pharmacists retire and need to pass their pharmacies on to the next generation. Believe me, those pharmacists do not want CVS or Wal-Green’s buying their stores. They want you, the future pharmacists, to buy them and continue on their tradition of serving their community.

If you have any further questions about independent pharmacy, please feel free to email Joe at pcdruggist@earthlink.net

Tailgate with UPCO and Darby Grace Church on Friday, October 22.

Join the Uptown Plain City Organization (UPCO) and Darby Grace Church for a Community Tailgate party on Friday, October 22, before the Alder vs. McClain football game. This tailgate party will be held on the lawn of Darby Grace Church, 9899 U. S. Route 42 South (across from The Cheese House). Pastor Shawn Kaeser of Darby Grace will be grilling hot dogs and there will be other food, games, music, and chances to win Alder prizes. Stop by from 5-6:30 pm before you head to the football game. The game starts at 7:30 pm.

For more information: 1st Annual UPCO and Darby Grace Church’s Community Tailgate

Our Front Window Features our Mad Scientists!

We always try to decorate our front windows to correspond with the seasons or with events in Plain City. With Halloween right around the corner, we decorated one window to feature our “mad scientists,” Joe and, our pharmacy student, Matt.

The other window is decorated with our still, nameless knight. We are currently asking customers to “Name Our Knight,” so if you can think of a striking, manly name for our suit of armor, stop in the pharmacy before the end of October and turn in the name you think we’ll choose. You could win a $50 gift certificate to Plain City Ironing (appropriate for our Ironman), Main Street Treasures (knights are always looking for elusive goblets–where else to find something as enchanting as the Holy Grail?), or C & A Harley Davidson (a knight needs a steed, even if it has wheels instead of hooves).

Check out our windows the next time you are in. Who says you can’t window shop in Plain City?